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. >> and protest in tahrir square as anger continues to grow against egyptian president mohammed morsi. we'll have a live report. >> new information on what may have caused a freight train carrying dangerous chemicals to derail in new jersey. >> heather: the clock is winding down to a potential economic disaster. there has been a lot of talk apparently nothing to show for it. democrats and republicans blaming each other nor the standoff with your tax bill riding on the out come. unless an agreement is reached by the end of the month, bush-era tax cuts will expire triggering a rise in taxes by an average of 5%. that means a middle-class family will pay $2,000 more in taxes and married couples would be hurt because of marriage penalty. it doesn't include the budget consequences. $55 billion would be cut from the pentagon and another $55 billion slashed from domestic programs. an estimated 2 million jobs could be lost pushing the economy back into a recession adding to the misery to those facing tough times by ending jobless benefits for the long term unemployed. steve is live in washington. where do
process and a power grab by the next president who just took the reins, president mohammed morsi. much more on this coming up in a live report. greg palkot is back on the ground in cairo. we'll talk to greg there. here in newtown, a place residents are proud, they are proud to call this place home. in a moment i'll talk live with one person who lived here their entire life about how the tragedy impacted her and her neighbors as investigators start putting the pieces together [ sniffs ] i have a cold. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! >> bill: this is a community that will come together in ways it never thought before even imaginable as they gather in churches throughout the weekend dealing with the shock of what happened at sandy hook. it was shock initially. it is a stunned feeling today and i think in some ways that
if mohammed morsi gets his way at the ballot box. tomorrow, the second half of egypt votes on a draft constitution that critics say begins the process of turning the arab world populist country in an islamic state. at the halfway point, those in favor of the move lead the vote by a double digit margin. saturday includes voters in mostly southern egyptian provinces, typically poorer and experts say likely to favor the islamist by wider margin. the latest round of violence began last month when morsi gave himself almost king like powers bridging thousands of people to the street in protest and forcing the army to ring the presidential residents with tanks. the speed at which morsi is pushing through constitution that limits the free speech and women's right, while being based largely on shiria or islamic law is increasing fears that the muslim brotherhood is ruling egypt by that old adage. "one man, one vote. one time." john? >> leland vittert in jerusalem. thanks. still ahead. solutions to flip the script when it comes to debt and deficit. first, the national rival association calls fo
killed as they lined up at a bakery to get the bread. mohammed jamjoon joins us by phone from beruit. some of the video you are about to see is extremely graphic. what can you tell us? >> dana, it's horrific and grizzly details that are emerging. opposition activist says hundreds were lined up to get bread from the bakery. the first time it opened in over a week in the town of haifa. it was shelled by a warplane overhead and at least 1200 people killed in the attack. the amateur video posted online shows an extremely gruesome scene. mangled corpses in the rubble. you can see rebel army officers and civilians trying to help the wounded. a terrible, terrible tragedy according to whom we've been speaking with. that town harbors a lot of anti government sentiment. liberated by rebels just a week ago. and because of that, they were targeted by the regime yesterday. they issues a statement and blame what happened to terrorists, and that's the term they use when talking about rebel fighters. the townspeople called for help. called for intervention from the syrian regime. and they sent in mi
of homs. mohammed jamjoom joins me from beirut and lakhdar brahimi met with syria's president. before we get to that meeting, let's talk about the bakery bombings, the opposition is saying essentially once a town is, quote, liberated and taken over by rebels, the government's dropping bombs on lines of civilians waiting for bread on purpose in order to terrorize themohammed. >> reporter: that's right. the syrian government is saying that as of yet what happened was the work of terrorists it was terrorists that went there, that carried out the massacre and the syrian military went in there and killed and captured many of them and restored order. that's different than what we're hearing from the eyewitnesses and residents there who say they were targeted on purpose. we must remember we're hearing more and more the last few months about bakeries being targeted. human rights watch in august said that at least ten occasions in aleppo province that bakeries were targeted that scores of people were killed and injured as a result. a lot of the activists we speak with say that more and more these
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5